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Goodey and Cressall

Goodey & Cressall was a major (and prolific) architectural practice in the town and many buildings of value in Colchester - including some important buildings in the town (some of which are listed) - were designed over several decades (19th and 20th centuries) by J F Goodey and, later, by Goodey & Cressall: see list below. The buildings include a wide range of functions and styles.

J F Goodey is a significant figure in the history and fabric of Colchester, as an architect, builder and developer. From 1878 he developed New Town, also building two houses for himself in that development (2 Winnock Road [New Town House] and, later, New Town Lodge). He was a Liberal, Nonconformist and member of the Co-operative Society (listed as 'Mr. J. F. GOODEY New Town Lodge, Colchester' for the London Branch Committee of the Co-operative Wholesale Society at www.archive.org). He worked with local builders and his clients were mostly Colchester residents, tradesmen and businessmen, including some of the most notable in the town, ie Joslin, Lucking, Paxman, Marriage, Kavanagh. Some of his clients commissioned him repeatedly, eg Paxman and Marriage.

'... Most growth, however, was at New Town, developed from 1878 south of the road to the Hythe, a large compact area between army land on the west and Paxman's engineering factory at the Hythe on the east: 293 houses were built there by 1885. (fn. 85) Morant, Harsnett, and King Stephen Roads were built there on the Wimpole estate between Wimpole Road and Park Lane from 1899, and Claudius, Campion, Lisle, Barrington, and part of Canterbury Roads on the Goldwell's estate (previously occupied by Bunting's nursery) on the south side of the barracks from 1901. (fn. 86) J. F. Goodey, a local builder, other members of the Co-operative movement, and local Liberals were influential in the development of New Town, hence the name Gladstone Road. The intention was to create a social mix through the provision of varied housing. Goodey himself, who specialized in precast concrete architectural detail, lived in a detached house, New Town Lodge, in New Town Road. (fn. 87) Terraced houses, with some better ones for foremen, were laid out on a gridiron road pattern and higher quality houses were built on the southern periphery in Granville and Gladstone Roads or in terraces overlooking the recreation ground.

Building societies played an important role in the expansion of the housing market. The Colchester Permanent Benefit building society, founded in 1856, and the Colchester Co-operative Mutual Permanent Benefit building society, founded in 1869, later the Colchester Equitable building society, advanced money to members to buy houses either to live in themselves or as an investment. Money was lent to women on the same terms as men, and by 1878 the number of working-class borrowers was increasing. By 1894 the Colchester Equitable had advanced £115,000 on 630 cottages, 28 businesses, 7 large houses, and 1 chapel, mostly in the town or the immediately surrounding area. (fn. 88) Colchester Co-operative Society also enabled some of its members to become owner-occupiers. In 1879, with surplus capital, it bought some plots on the New Town estate, built four cottages on them, and allotted them to members who paid for them by easy instalments; four more cottages were provided soon afterwards, and likewise four in 1884 in Rawstorn Road and four in 1886 in Pelham Road. (fn. 89) ...' - from VCH 9, published online at www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=21988

There are very few Art Deco buildings in Colchester town centre, so 147-149 High Street are important as well as interesting buildings. Other buildings built in Colchester in the 1920s and designed by Goodey & Cressall are not in the High Street.

Goodey & Cressall:
Heath House, Heath Road (south side), additions of 1908
2-4 Headgate (Headgate Buildings)
21 Cambridge Road
52-54 Creffield Road (1891)
7-9 Oxford Road (1893; Pevsner/Bettley 2007)
former Wilson Marrriage school - listed (1896)
S-W wing of Essex County Hospital (1897-8)
6-8 St Botolph's Street - for the Liberal Club (1898)
St John's Green Primary School - listed (1898)
North Primary School - listed (c 1900)
additions to Bakery, Kendall Road, Colchester (1902; ERO D/B 6 Pb3/1761, for Colchester Co-operative Society (owner)) [surviving??]
New Town junior school (1903)
Methodist Church, Wimpole Road (1903-4; ERO D/B 6 Pb3/1898)
25-31 Long Wyre Street - for the Co-operative Society (c 1914; Pevsner/Bettley 2007)
former St Helen's Lane school (1904) - the ERO holds D/B 6 Pb3/2064, building plan of additions, St. Helen's Lane, Colchester Building plan of additions, St. Helen's Lane, Colchester, 1904, for Central National Schools (owner)
Oddfellows' Hall, George Street (1909)
20 St Clare Road (c 1912)
75 Culver Street - for the Co-operative Society (c 1914)
61-65 North Station Road (east side) - for Co-operative Society, c 1924
1 Long Wyre Street - Co-Operative department store, 1925-6
23 Drury Road - for the Co-operative Society (c 1926)
39 Claudius Road - for the Co-operative Society (c 1926)
147-149 High Street (1927)
former school in Greenstead Road??

Pevsner/Bettley 2007: '... A particularly distinctive group [of schools] is to be found in Colchester by Goodey & Cressall, 1892-1903 ...'

[Outside Colchester, Goodey & Cressall designed the Richard de Clare Primary School in Halstead, 1909-10 (Pevsner/Bettley 2007). W T Cressall designed a hospital block for Halstead in 1920-1 (Pevsner/Bettley 2007). Also new residence in Holland Road, Clacton, 1934 (ERO D/UCt Pb1/5334). Also isolation hospital at Halstead (1895; plans ERO D/UH Pb1/3).]

W T Cressall & Duncan Clark:
outpatients' dept. at Essex County Hospital, 1924-6

W T Cressall:
building on left of Eld Lane Baptist Church (1923; Pevsner/Bettley 2007)

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biographical:
James Frederick Goodey - born at Stoke in Suffolk in 1834; christened Halstead; son of James and Sarah Goody. His father was a wheelwright. J F Goodey married Emma Draper in 1853 and thier children were James, Edward, Harry, Emma and Fanny; he married Jane King in Colchester District in 1865, and their children were Arthur, Albert, Alice, Elizabeth and Florence. In 1861, J F G was living at 6 Mill Street in Colchester and he was foreman to a joiner. In 1881 he was living at 4 Portland Road, and he was an architect and surveyor employing 20 people. [Son H Goodey lived in Lexden, workshop in Kendall Road??] In 1901, J F G was living at 99 Winnock Road and he was an architect. He died in Croydon in 1910. [J F G owned Osmon Road??]

Walter Thomas Cressall - 1866-1925

James Edward Pluck - born 1870, worked for Goodey & Cressall from 1897; premises at St Peter's Chambers, High Street, Colchester in 1912 ('Directory of British architects 1834-1914').LRIBA 1912.

Plans by J F Goodey:
ERO D/B 6 Pb1/15 -
ERO D/B 6 Pb1/16 -
ERO D/B 6 Pb3/8, building plan of cottages, Lexden, Colchester, 1885, for R. Wilby (owner) by J. F. Goodey (architect)
ERO D/B 6 Pb3/10 , building plan of cottages, Hythe Hill, Colchester, 1885, for T. Moy (owner) by J. F. Goodey (architect)
ERO D/B 6 Pb3/13, building plan of cottages, Granville Road, New Town Estate, Colchester, 1885, by J. F. Goodey (owner and architect)
ERO D/B 6 Pb3/14, building plan of cottages, Granville Road, New Town Estate, Colchester, 1885, by J. F. Goodey (owner and architect)
ERO D/B 6 Pb3/15, building plan of villa, Wimpole Lane (Road), Colchester, 1885, for H. Goodey (owner) by J. F. Goodey (architect)
ERO D/B 6 Pb3/29, building plan of cottages, Granville Road, Colchester, 1885, by J. F. Goodey (owner and architect)
ERO D/B 6 Pb3/43, building plan of two cottages, Maldon Road, Colchester Building plan of two cottages, Maldon Road, Colchester, 1886, for T. Clarke (owner) by J. F. Goodey (architect)
ERO D/B 6 Pb3/44, building plan of alterations and additions, High Street, Colchester, 1886, for [Mr. Francisco] (owner) by J. F. Goodey (architect)
ERO D/B 6 Pb3/62 and D/B 6 Pb3/62A, building plans of villa, Creffield Estate (The Towers), Colchester, 1886, for W. Sparling (owner) by J. F. Goodey (architect)
ERO D/B 6 Pb3/129, building plan of stables, Creffield Road, Colchester, 1887, for W. Sparling (owner) by J. F. Goodey (architect)
ERO D/B 6 Pb3/63, building plan of stable and coach house, Victoria Road, Colchester, 1886, for A. Prior (owner) by J. F. Goodey (architect)
ERO D/B 6 Pb3/64, building plan of shops, etc., St. Nicholas Street, Colchester, 1886, for Warmington and Co. (owners) by J. F. Goodey (architect)
ERO D/B 6 Pb3/93, building plan of new offices, Britannia Works, Colchester, 1886, for Britannia Co. (owner) by J. F. Goodey (architect)
ERO D/B 6 Pb3/115, building plan of new Fitters' Shop and warehouse, Standard Iron Works, St. Leonard's Road, Colchester, 1887, for Davey Paxman and Co. (owner) by J. F. Goodey (architect)
ERO D/B 6 Pb3/128, building plan of Foundry, The Hythe, Colchester, 1887, fr Davey Paxman and Co. (owner) by J. F. Goodey (architect)
ERO D/B 6 Pb3/132, building plan of alterations and additions and two cottages, Military Road, Colchester, 1887, by J. F. Goodey (owner and architect)
ER D/B 6 Pb3/153, building plan of two cottages, Military Road, Colchester, 1887, by J. F. Goodey (owner and architect) ['Information for both entries on same plan']
ERO D/B 6 Pb3/133, building plan of alterations, High Street, Colchester, 1887, for J. Joslin (owner) by J. F. Goodey (architect)
ERO D/B 6 Pb3/157, building plan of seven cottages, Gladstone Road, Colchester, 1887, by J. F. Goodey (owner and architect)
ERO D/B 6 Pb3/161 Building plan of cart lodge and Granary, Hythe, Colchester, 1887, for T. Moy (owner) by J. F. Goodey (architect)
ERO D/B 6 Pb3/180 Building plan of villa, Oxford Road, Colchester, 1888, for G. Palmer (owner) by J. F. Goodey (architect)
ERO D/B 6 Pb3/200, building plan of house and shop, Butt Road, Colchester, 1888, for H. Jones (owner) by J. F. Goodey (architect)
ERO D/B 6 Pb3/208 Building plan of cottage, Military Road, Colchester, 1888, for Mr. Young (owner) by J. F. Goodey (architect)
ERO D/B 6 Pb3/237 Building plan of new Currying Warehouse, Factory Lane, Colchester, 1888, for F. Warmington and Co. (owner) by J. F. Goodey (architect)
ERO D/B 6 Pb3/238, building plan of new wood/workshop, Standard Iron Works, Park Lane, Colchester, 1888, for Davey Paxman and Co. (owner) by J. F. Goodey (architect)
ERO D/B 6 Pb3/252, building plan of two cottages, Cannon Street, Colchester, 1889, for Mr. Wade (owner) by J. F. Goodey (architect)
ERO D/B 6 Pb3/261, building plan of new classrooms, etc., Baptist Chapel, [no owner or location recorded], Colchester, 1889, by J.F. Goddey[Goodey] (architect)
ERO D/B 6 Pb3/262 Building plan of five cottages, New Park Street, Colchester, 1889, for L. Daldry (owner) by J. F. Goodey (architect)
ERO D/B 6 Pb3/267 Building plan of workshop, Kendall Road, Colchester, 1889, by J. F. Goodey (owner and architect)
ERO D/B 6 Pb3/276 Building plan of new factory, Portland Road, Colchester, 1889, for Messrs. Knapp and Son (owners) by J. F. Goodey (architect)
ERO D/B 6 Pb3/280, building plan of stables, North Hill, Colchester, 1889, for Colchester Provident Asylum Society (owner) by J. F. Goodey (architect)
ERO D/B 6 Pb3/284, building plan of Boot Factory, Stanwell Street, Colchester, 1889, for J. Kavanagh (owner) by J. F. Goodey (architect)
ERO D/B 6 Pb3/311, building plan of eight cottages, Myrtle Grove, Colchester, 1889, by J. F. Goodey (owner and architect)
ERO D/B 6 Pb3/317 Building plan of extension of foundry, Standard Iron Works, Colchester, 1890, for Davey Paxman and Co. (owner) by J. F. Goodey (architect)
ERO D/B 6 Pb3/357, building plan of new shops, High Street and St. Nicholas Street, Colchester, 1890, for F.W. Warmington and Co. (owner) by J. F. Goodey (architect)
ERO D/B 6 Pb3/368, building plan of five cottages, Butt Road, Colchester, 1890, for J. Clark (owner) by J. F. Goodey (architect)
ERO D/B 6 Pb3/374, building plan of workshop, Standard Iron Works, Colchester, 1890, for J.N. Paxman (owner) by J. F. Goodey (architect)
ERO D/B 6 Pb3/377, building plan of workshop, Britannia Works, Magdalen Street, Colchester, 1890, for Britannia Co. (owner) by J. F. Goodey (architect)
ERO D/B 6 Pb3/390, building plan of pair of houses, Gladstone Road, Colchester, 1890, by J. F. Goodey (owner and architect)
ERO D/B 6 Pb3/407, building plan of three houses, Creffield Road, Colchester, 1891, for W.A. Chambers (owner) by J. F. Goodey (architect)
ERO D/B 6 Pb3/418, building plan of two houses, Winnock Road, Colchester, 1891 (no stamp), by J. F. Goodey (owner and architect)
ERO D/B 6 Pb3/424, building plan of Lodge, Plum Hall, Mersea Road/Berechurch Road, Colchester, 1891, for H.W. Jones (owner) by J. F. Goodey (architect)
ERO D/B 6 Pb3/447, building plan of conservatory, Plum Hall, Mersea Road, Colchester, 1891, for H.W. Jones (owner) by J. F. Goodey (architect)
ERO D/B 6 Pb3/441, building plan of warehouse, Pelham's Lane, Colchester, 1891, for E.J. Sanders (owner) by J. F. Goodey (architect)
ERO D/B 6 Pb3/425, building plan of additions to warehouse, Pelhams Lane, Colchester, 1891, for E.J. Sanders (owner) by J. F. Goodey (architect)
ERO D/B 6 Pb3/433, building plan of rebuilding of Nelsons Head Public House, West Stockwell Street, Colchester, 1891, no plan??, for the Colchester Brewing Co. (owner) by J. F. Goodey (architect) - see plan, ERO D/B 6 Pb3/466
ERO D/B 6 Pb3/436, building plan of clothing factory, Stanwell Street, Colchester, 1891, for Mr. Hammond (owner) by J. F. Goodey (architect)
ERO D/B 6 Pb3/448, building plan of warehouse, Priory Street, Colchester, 1891, [Monkwell Street Warehouse Company, E.C. (owner)] by J. F. Goodey (architect)
ERO D/B 6 Pb3/470, building plan of house, Gladstone Road, Colchester, 1891, by J. F. Goodey (owner and architect)
ERO D/B 6 Pb3/482, building plan of stables and coach houses, Military Road, Colchester, 1892 (no stamp), by J. F. Goodey (owner and architect)
ERO D/B 6 Pb3/502, building plan of factory, Magdalen Street, Colchester, 1892, for Hart and Levy (owners) by J. F. Goodey (architect)
ERO D/B 6 Pb3/531, building plan of six cottages, Priory Street, Colchester, 1892, for E.A. Studd (owner) by J. F. Goodey (architect)
ERO D/B 6 Pb3/532, building plan of pair of houses, Inglis Road, Colchester, 1892 (no stamp), for Messrs. George and Johnson (owner) by J. F. Goodey (architect)
ERO D/B 6 Pb3/535, building plan of workshop, Magdalen Street, Colchester, 1892, for Messrs. Pickess and Stanton (owners) by J. F. Goodey (architect)
ERO D/B 6 Pb3/561, building plan of workshop, Kendall Road, Colchester, 1892, for H. Goodey and Co. (owner) by J. F. Goodey (architect)
ERO D/B 6 Pb3/565 Building plan of three cottages, Priory Street, Colchester, 1892, for Studd (owner) by J. F. Goodey (architect)
ERO D/B 6 Pb3/582 Building plan of warehouse and stable, Foundry Yard, High Street, Colchester, 1893, for Stanford and Co. (owners) by J. F. Goodey (architect)
ERO D/B 6 Pb3/583 Building plan of warehouse, Hythe Hill, Colchester, 1893, for T. Moy Ltd. (owner) by J. F. Goodey (architect)

Plans by Goodey & Cressall:
ERO D/B 6 Pb3/598, building plan of cottages, Priory Grove, Colchester, 1893, for E.A. Studd (owner) by Goodey and Cressall (architects)
ERO D/B 6 Pb3/599, building plan of two villas, Oxford Road, Colchester, 1893, for E. Beard (owner) by Goodey and Cressall (architects)
ERO D/B 6 Pb3/600, building plan of house, Priory Street, Colchester, 1893,
no plan??, for G. Wash (owner) by Goodey and Cressall (architects)
ERO D/B 6 Pb3/601, building plan of shed off Military Road, New Town, Colchester, 1893, for J.F. Goodey (owner) by Goodey and Cressall (architects)
ERO D/B 6 Pb3/618, building plan of house, Priory Street, Colchester, for G. Wash (owner) by Goodey and Cressall (architects)
ERO D/B 6 Pb3/628, building plan of villas, Military Road, Colchester, 1893, for J.F. Goodey (owner) by Goodey and Cressall (architects)
ERO D/B 6 Pb3/649, building plan of alterations, Crouch Street, Colchester, 1893, for Mr. Page (owner) by Goodey and Cressall (architects)
ERO D/B 6 Pb3/677, building plan of four pairs of cottages, Military Road, Colchester, 1893, for J.F. Goodey (owner) by Goodey and Cressall (architects)
ERO D/B 6 Pb3/735 and D/B 6 Pb3/747, building plan of cart shed, New Town Road, Colchester, 1894, for Colchester Co-operative Society (owner) by Goodey and Cressall (architects)
ERO D/B 6 Pb3/752 and D/B 6 Pb3/762, building plan of villa, Wimpole Lane and Gladstone Road, Colchester, 1894, for W.A. Chambers (owner) by Goodey and Cressall (architects)
ERO D/B 6 Pb3/768, building plan of four cottages, Pond Lane, Colchester, 1894, for J.F. Goodey (owner) by Goodey and Cressall (architects)
ERO D/B 6 Pb3/878 and D/B 6 Pb3/888, building plan of additions to factory, Portland Road, Colchester, 1895, for Knapp and Son (owners) by Goodey and Cressall (architects) - and see D/B 6 Pb3/908
ERO D/B 6 Pb3/895, building plan of pair of villas, New Town Road, Colchester, 1895, for J.F. Goodey (owner) by Goodey and Cressall (architects)

Buildings designed by Goodey & Cressall but not surviving:
Wesleyan Methodist church in Culver Street, demolished for the new shopping precinct - '... In 1900 the church was remodelled to plans by W. Cressall and J. F. Goodey, providing a suite of rooms and a caretakers' house in place of the old cottages, and an imposing new facade with twin flanking towers. The interior was remodelled with a new choir gallery and rostrum. The church was gutted by fire in 1926, but was rebuilt on its former plan and reopened in 1928 ...' - www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=22011
The ERO holds D/B 6 Pb3/2057, building plan of additions to Wesleyan Methodist Schools, Culver Street, Colchester, 1904, by Goodey & Cressall. Some stained glass from the Culver Street chapel of 1900 is preserved as an entrance screen at the Castle Methodist Chapel.
ERO D/B 6 Pb3/786 Building plan of two villas, New Town Road, Colchester, 1894, J.F. Goodey (owner) by Goodey and Cressall (architects)
ERO D/B 6 Pb3/872 Building plan of pair of cottages, Military Road, Colchester, 1895, for J.F. Goodey (owner) Goodey and Cressall (architect)

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The ERO holds other documents:
* D/B 6 Pb3/1541, the building plan of six cottages, Morant Road, Colchester, 1901, for J. F. Goodey junior (owner and builder) by Goodey and Cressall (architects).
* D/B 6 Pb3/1557, the building plan of seven houses, King Stephen Road, Colchester, 1901, for J. F. Goodey junior (owner and builder) by Goodey and Cressall (architects).
* D/B 6 Pb3/1643, document relating to two houses, Morant Road, Colchester, 1901, for F. J. Goodey (owner and builder) by Goodey and Cressall (architects).
* D/B 6 Pb3/1665, building plan of cottages, Bourne Road, Colchester, 1902, for J. F. Goodey junior (owner and builder) by Goodey and Cressall (architects).
* D/B 6 Pb3/1811 , building plan of two pairs of cottages, King Stephen Road, Colchester, Colchester, 1903, for J. F. Goodey junior (owner and builder) by
Goodey and Cressall
* D/B 6 Pb3/1885, building plan of two cottages, Bourne Road, Colchester, 1903,for J. F. Goodey junior (owner) by [Goodey and Cressall (architects)]
* D/B 6 Pb3/1920, building plan of cottages, Lisle Road, Colchester, 1903, for J. F. Goodey junior (owner) by Goodey and Cressall (architects) - F. Goodey (builder)
* D/B 6 Pb3/2085, building plan of house, Winchester Road, Colchester, 1904, for J. F. Goodey junior (owner and (builder)) by Goodey and Cressall (architects)
* D/B 6 Pb3/2112A, building plan of new road construction, from Cannon Street to King Stephen Road, Colchester, 1904, for J. F. Goodey junior (owner) by Goodey and Cressall (architects)
* D/B 6 Pb3/2122, building plan of thirty-nine houses, Cannon Street/King Stephen Road, Colchester, 1904, for J. F. Goodey junior (owner and builder) by Goodey and Cressall (architects)
* D/B 6 Pb3/2140, building plan of house, New Town Road, Colchester, 1905, for H. Goodey (owner) by Goodey and Cressall (architects) [J.F. Goodey junior (builder)]

* D/B 6 Pb3/1796, building plan of butcher's shop, Long Wyre Street, Colchester, 1903, for Colchester Co-operative Society Ltd. (owner)
by Goodey and Cressall
* D/B 6 Pb3/1827, building plan of reinstatement, St Botolph's Street, Colchester, 1903, for Messrs. A.J. Lucking and Co. (owner) by Goodey and Cressall
* D/B 6 Pb3/1587, the building plan of house, Errington Road, Colchester, 1901, for R. Hazell (owner) by Goodey and Cressall (architects).
* D/B 6 Pb3/1633, the building plan of two cottages, Pownall Crescent, Colchester, 1901, for Mrs. E. Harding (owner) by Goodey and Cressall (architects).
* D/B 6 Pb3/1847, building plan of house and shop at corner of Errington and Wickham Roads, Colchester, 1903, for Mr. Page (owner) by Goodey and Cressall
* D/B 6 Pb3/1861, building plan of new basement, St Botolph's Street, Colchester, 1903, for A. J. Lucking and Co. (owner) by Goodey and Cressall (architects)
* D/B 6 Pb3/1886, building plan of additions to premises, St. Botolph's Street, Colchester, 1903, for A. J. Lucking and Co. (owner) by Goodey and Cressall (architect)
* D/B 6 Pb3/1902, building plan of shop front, 30 High Street, Colchester, 1903, for A. G. Graves (owner) by Goodey and Cressall (architects)
* D/B 6 Pb3/1984, building plan of shop, Long Wyre Street, Colchester, 1904, for Colchester Co-operative Society (owner) by Goodey and Cressall (architects)
* D/B 6 Pb3/2012, building plan of tool shed, Rectory Lodge, Myland Road, Colchester, 1904, for G. Warner (owner) by Goodey and Cressall (architects)
* D/B 6 Pb3/2017, building plan of five cottages, Campion Road, Colchester, 1904, for J. F. Goodey junior (owner) by Goodey and Cressall (architects)

39 Claudius Road (south side)

Date
c1922

[JB] Shop for the Colchester Co-operative Society, c. 1922, by Goodey & Cressall. Single storey. Red brick. Parapet rising to central pediment with circular window. Originally two units (butchery and grocery).
Sunstantially unaltered example of modest branch premises for the Co-Op designed by Goodey & Cressall. Plans in Essex Record Office (D/B 6 Pb3/3853). [JB]

23 Drury Road (north side)

Date
c 1926

[JB] Shops for Colchester Co-operative Society, c. 1926, by Goodey & Cressall. Three units, originally confectionery, butchery, and (on corner) grocery. Single-storey, with decorative facade.
A largely unaltered example, in a prominent location, of typical branch premises designed by Goodey & Cressall for the Co-op. Plans in Essex Record Office (D/B 6 Pb3/4616). [JB]

21 Cambridge Road (west side)

Building Name/Street Number
21
Street Name
Cambridge Road
Date
c 1901

[JB] Detached house, c. 1901. By Goodey & Cressall for W.E. Child. Two storeys. Red brick. Half-timbered gable to right with two-storey canted bay. Gabled two-storey porch to left, with arched entrance.
A modest but unaltered house by prominent local architects. Plans in Essex Record Office (D/B 6 Pb3/2826). [JB]

52 & 54 Creffield Road (south side)

Date
c 1891

[JB] Pair of detached houses, c. 1891. By Goodey & Cressall for W.A. Chambers. White brick, including panels of decorative bricks. Two-storey canted bay to right, unusual V-plan bay to left.
Chambers was responsible for developing much of this area, and Goodey & Cressall were prominent Colchester architects. Identification based on plans in Essex Record Office (D/B 6 Pb3/407) for three houses in Creffield Road, with slight differences in detail. [JB]

20 St Clare Road (west side)

Date
c 1912

[JB] Large detached house, c. 1912. By Goodey & Cressall for V.E. Marshall. Two storeys and attics. Mainly red brick, with some plastered areas. Projecting gabled wing at front with two-storey canted bay; canted bays also on south and west elevations. Also on the west (garden) elevation a timber veranda with first-floor balcony. Contemporary detached garage.
An interesting house of its date by prominent local architects, part of an exclusive development of large houses. Unaltered exterior. Plans in Essex Record Office (D/B 6 Pb3/3166). [JB]

25-31 Long Wyre Street (west side)

Date
?1905

(Jaggers' list) [JB] Retained facade and front part of commercial premises, originally for the Co-Operative Society. Red brick with painted stucco dressings. Three storeys. Five bays, of which the outer bays are emphasised by quoins and have within them four-bay windows rising to triangular pediments. The centre bay contains a two-storey canted oriel, flanked by Ionic columns at second-floor level, and has a segmental pediment. Inscription 'Founded 1861' referring to the Colchester Co-Operative Society. Dentilled cornice. First-floor windows of Venetian type. [JB] Opened in 1905. ERO D/B 6 Pb3/1984, 1904, plan of shop, LONG WYRE Street, Colchester Co-operative Society (owner), Goodey and Cressall (architects), G. Dobson (builder) (not checked).

[Postcard of 1905 with kind permission of J Jephcott.]

147 High Street (north)

Date
1927

(Jaggers' list)

DEMOLISHED 2014: ONLY FACADE SURVIVES

Shop built in 1927 following a major fire which badly damaged buildings along the north side of the High Street from this site westwards as far as the corner with North Hill [check]. Designed by Goodey and Cressall for F. A. Jacklin (owner). Built by Beaumont and Son [builders]. Prominent position and design in the High Street. Art Deco but designed to fit in with 18th-century buildings/frontages in the High Street.

The shop was built for Jacklins, a tobacconist and confectioner, which occupied it until it was closed in 1997??. The upper floor was Jacklin's tearoom which was an important institution in the town for many years. The tearoom later included the upper floor of no 149.

Group value: makes a pair with its near contemporary no 149 High Street.

In 'Journals of wartime Colchester' by E J Rudsdale, with Hollytrees, Bourne Mill, Gordon Villas, the castle, etc.

Site of Roman pottery shop destroyed during the Boudican revolt in AD 61 - see http://cat.essex.ac.uk/reports/CAT-report-0012.pdf

Building plans of premises, High Street, Colchester - ERO D/B 6 Pb3/4904, 1927, 2 plans and 2 documents, for F.A. JACKLIN (owner), by Goodey and Cressall (architects) and Beaumont and Son [builders]

See ERO D/B 6 Pb3/5492, 1930, building plan of covered passage, High Street, Colchester, for Messrs. JACKLINS (owner), by D.J. McPherson-Burton (architect) and Appleton and Son [builders]

See ERO D/B 6 Pb3/6610, 1934, building plan of pent house, JACKLIN's Cafe, High Street, Colchester, for Baker and Burton (owners)

See ERO D/B 6 Pb3/9268, 1947, building plan of alterations to back staircase, 147 High Street, Colchester, for F. JACKLIN (owner), by Duncan Clark and Beckett (architects) and Messrs. A.E. Flory and Co. [builders]

See ERO D/B 6 Pb3/9158, 1947, building plan of ice cream processing workshop, 147 High Street, Colchester [missing], for F.A. JACKLIN (owner), by Duncan Clark and Beckett (architects)

See also ERO D/RLw Pb1/2057, 1932, building plan of additions to 'The Poplars', West Bergholt, for F.A. Jacklin (owner), by Baker and Burton (architect)

See also ERO D/B 6 Pb3/7491, 1936, building plan of alterations to 17 Inglis Road, Colchester, Mr F.A. JACKLIN (owner and architect), Flory and Co. [builders]

Old postcard by kind permission of J Jephcott (1960s??).

Extracts from E J Rudsdale's 'Journals of wartime Colchester':
'...
19th September 1939
'... Met Joy Allgood [a local school teacher] at 5 o’clock, and went to tea at Jacklin’s [Restaurant]. She is really a most charming girl. Just before the war began she was in Switzerland, and had to leave in a very great hurry. She says the journey across France was very bad ...'

6th September 1940
'... Three alarms today, 9.30-10, 1.25-1.50, (right in my lunch hour), and 6.30-6.45, which caught me in Jacklin’s having tea, which I had to leave unfinished ...'

7th January 1941
'... German plane over this morning, and an alarm at 2.15. Parrington from Lawford came in and told me that the plane this morning had dropped several bombs on or near the Xylonite Works at Brantham, and some more near the mine depot at Wix, but no damage was done so far as he knew. He wants to buy another chaff cutter.
Another alarm from 4.30-5, but I was at Bourne Mill, and could not go. At least one plane came over. Had tea in Jacklin’s [Restaurant] and another alarm sounded at a quarter to 6. I went down to the Castle, but it only lasted 10 minutes ...' - at http://wwar2homefront.blogspot.com/2011/01/7th-january-1941.html

11th January 1941
'... Warmer. Thawing fast. Rushed all morning. Went to the Repertory Co. this afternoon for the first time for months to see “Saloon Bar”. Not so well done as the film, which I saw recently.
Tea at Jacklin’s, where I was lucky enough to be able to pinch six lumps of sugar. There was a very lovely woman next to me at the Repertory Company, and I half thought of asking her to tea, but she hurried out of the Hall so quickly it was obvious she had other ideas ...' - http://wwar2homefront.blogspot.com/2011_01_01_archive.html

7th February 1941
'... Went back to the office and finished off some letters. Had tea at Jacklins ...'

29th March 1941
'... Had tea at Jacklin’s this afternoon with George [Farmer] and his wife. I do not think he is at all happy, although he says he has not done one stroke of work since he joined [the RAF] ...'

3rd June 1941
'... Had tea at Jacklin’s. Three women came in and sat near me. One was a middle aged country looking woman, the second a smart young lady of about 25 or 30, short black hair, smart country clothes, with a severe little green hat, and the third was a lovely “Burne-Jones” girl, about 25, with a great halo of glorious light brown hair, parted in the middle and falling softly round an exceptionally pretty face. She had large grey eyes, no lipstick and wore a black fur coat. I wonder who she was ...'

22nd October 1941
'... Went to tea at Jacklin’s, and saw Mrs. Betty Prior, looking very charming, just about to leave for London on the motor coach. Saw her off, just across the street ...'

17th December 1941
'... Had tea at Jacklins, for the first time for a week or so, and then went to the stables ...'

13th February 1942
'... I had to make with a scrap lunch at Jacklin’s, which was also very crowded ...'
etc

[Rudsdale's diaries published as 'E.J. Rudsdale's Journals of Wartime Colchester']

See ERO SA 8/1372/1 - Stephen JACKLIN - Colchester Pipe Club, tape and transcript, 'Colchester Recalled': 'Synopsis of tape: Memories of Colchester Pipe Club which met 4 or 5 times a year at JACKLIN's Restaurant; number of members; pipe smoking competitions; JACKLIN's sold pipes, tabacco, cigarettes etc.; types of pipes in 1920s; prices; different kinds of tobacco; views on pipe smoking'.
See a Jacklins artefact at http://www.flickr.com/photos/sludgeulper/3038154457/
In 1923, FA Jacklin presented the Jacklin Cup for the Under 18 Junior Mixed Doubles at the COLCHESTER AND DISTRICT TENNIS LEAGUE

In 1926, the souvenir programme of the Colchester Amateur Operatic Society's production of 'The Mikado' stated that 'All Chocolates and Sweets sold in this Theatre are supplied by JACKLIN, High Street and Head Street, Colchester' [the theatre was the Hippodrome]
In a later programme, there is an advertisement for Jacklins which reads: '... JACKLIN'S - Telephone 2157 - ?? and restaurant - Morning coffee; Table d'hote luncheons; Afternoon teas; Evening parties - 147 High Street - Colchester ...'

Goodey & Cressall was a major (and prolific) architectural practice in the town and many buildings of value in Colchester - including some important buildings in the town (some of which are listed) - were designed over several decades (19th and 20th centuries) by J F Goodey and, later, by Goodey & Cressall: see list below. The buildings include a wide range of functions and styles.

J F Goodey is a significant figure in the history and fabric of Colchester, as an architect, builder and developer. From 1878 he developed New Town, also building two houses for himself in that development (2 Winnock Road [New Town House] and, later, New Town Lodge). He was a Liberal, Nonconformist and member of the Co-operative Society (listed as 'Mr. J. F. GOODEY New Town Lodge, Colchester' for the London Branch Committee of the Co-operative Wholesale Society at www.archive.org). He worked with local builders and his clients were mostly Colchester residents, tradesmen and businessmen, including some of the most notable in the town, ie Joslin, Lucking, Paxman, Marriage, Kavanagh. Some of his clients commissioned him repeatedly, eg Paxman and Marriage.

'... Most growth, however, was at New Town, developed from 1878 south of the road to the Hythe, a large compact area between army land on the west and Paxman's engineering factory at the Hythe on the east: 293 houses were built there by 1885. (fn. 85) Morant, Harsnett, and King Stephen Roads were built there on the Wimpole estate between Wimpole Road and Park Lane from 1899, and Claudius, Campion, Lisle, Barrington, and part of Canterbury Roads on the Goldwell's estate (previously occupied by Bunting's nursery) on the south side of the barracks from 1901. (fn. 86) J. F. Goodey, a local builder, other members of the Co-operative movement, and local Liberals were influential in the development of New Town, hence the name Gladstone Road. The intention was to create a social mix through the provision of varied housing. Goodey himself, who specialized in precast concrete architectural detail, lived in a detached house, New Town Lodge, in New Town Road. (fn. 87) Terraced houses, with some better ones for foremen, were laid out on a gridiron road pattern and higher quality houses were built on the southern periphery in Granville and Gladstone Roads or in terraces overlooking the recreation ground.

Building societies played an important role in the expansion of the housing market. The Colchester Permanent Benefit building society, founded in 1856, and the Colchester Co-operative Mutual Permanent Benefit building society, founded in 1869, later the Colchester Equitable building society, advanced money to members to buy houses either to live in themselves or as an investment. Money was lent to women on the same terms as men, and by 1878 the number of working-class borrowers was increasing. By 1894 the Colchester Equitable had advanced £115,000 on 630 cottages, 28 businesses, 7 large houses, and 1 chapel, mostly in the town or the immediately surrounding area. (fn. 88) Colchester Co-operative Society also enabled some of its members to become owner-occupiers. In 1879, with surplus capital, it bought some plots on the New Town estate, built four cottages on them, and allotted them to members who paid for them by easy instalments; four more cottages were provided soon afterwards, and likewise four in 1884 in Rawstorn Road and four in 1886 in Pelham Road. (fn. 89) ...' - from VCH 9, published online at www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=21988

There are very few Art Deco buildings in Colchester town centre, so 147-149 High Street are important as well as interesting buildings. Other buildings built in Colchester in the 1920s and designed by Goodey & Cressall are not in the High Street.

The famous Jacklins resturant/tea rooms used to be on the first floor with 1930s decor, and with a tobacconist/confectionery shop below, which used paper bags decorated with the Jacklins' Art Deco logo.

Nos 146-151 form a group. [Nos 147-149 are unusual buildings for Goodey & Cressall?? - function and style]

Art Deco is defined as a design movement 1910-1939 - see http://heritage.elettra.co.uk/artdeco/ and, for a directory of designers, http://home.freeuk.net/eastburytech/GCSE-Resouce/art-deco-biography.htm
Other 1910-1939 buildings in the High Street/town centre:
Lloyds TSB (1926)
1-2 High Street (1936)
Burton's (1936)
Art Deco buildings in the High Street/town centre:

Read an introduction to Art Deco at www.arthistory.net/artstyles/artdeco/artdeco1.html

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See J F Goodey AND Goodey & Cressall entries in the 'Architects' section on this web-site.

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Notes
is this F A Jacklin??:
In 1901 Census, Clara Jacklin, widow, born London, was Licensed Victualler at the Ship inn, 1 Head Street, Colchester, and lived there with children Ethel and Frederick (aged 8), and mother Mary Ann Winter, widow, and sister and housekeeper Sophie Russell, barmaid Gertrude Archer, housemaid Clara L Turner, and brother Arthur Winter, Licensed Victuallers Manager, and a visitor, John East, Provision Merchant.
In 1895, Geo Wm Jacklin was licensee of the Head Gate Hotel in St Johns Street.

St George's New Town Junior School, Canterbury Road (south side)

Date
1903

[JB] School, 1903, by Goodey & Cressall. Red brick. Two storeys, with tall, 'Queen Anne'-style sash windows. Large Dutch gables, some with straight and others with segmental pediments. Small tower at east end with
steep ogee roof and lantern.
The last of a series of Board Schools designed by Goodey & Cressall following the formation of the Colchester School Board in 1892. The schools are each different but have shared characteristics, e.g. gables and asymmetric towers. The other schools (in John Harper Street, Barrack Street, and St John's Green) are all listed Grade II. [JB]

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SEAX:
SA 8/477/1 - created 1989
Title: Memories of a Colchester Head Teacher from 1905
Speaker(s): Carter, Olwen
Colchester Recalled
Synopsis of tape: Interview with Miss Olwen Mabel Carter, born Colchester 1905, retired Head Mistress; father a painter and decorator; childhood and family life; educated at St Mary's County High School and Brighton Teachers' College (1925-27); experiences as a student teacher at Canterbury Road Infants School (1924), All Saints Church School (1927-30), Lexden Road School (1930-55); appointed Head Mistress of small school in Walton-on-the-Naze (3 years) and then at Prettygate Junior School until retirement in 1968; reflections on changes in children over the years, parents' attitudes and expectations, the new national curriculum and parent governors, the effect of television and modern technical aids.
.

9 Oxford Road (west side)

Date
1893

[JB] Large house, 1893, by Goodey & Cressall for E. Beard. Red brick with stone dressings. Large gabled 'cross-wing' with two-storey canted bay window. To the left of this a single-storey canted bay beneath a half-timbered jettied upper storey. Turreted porch on right return.
An interesting variation on the villa theme, characteristic of this quarter of Colchester, by prominent local architects. Plans in Essex Record Office (D/B 6/Pb3/599). Forms a group with 7 Oxford Road, of which it is a mirror image. [JB]
[DS] Arts and Crafts gate piers and walls.

[See list of buildings in Colchester/building plans designed by Goodey and Cressall under 147-149 High Street.]

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